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The Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) is a federally funded initiative administered by the United States Department of Education.  Since 1999, the California GEAR UP Program has been administered by the University of California with a charge to lead systemic reform through a programmatic focus on enhancing the organizational capacity of middle schools to prepare ALL students for success after high school.  The California GEAR UP Program serves primarily the adults who impact secondary school students: faculty, counselors, administrators, and families.

History

The Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) is a federally funded initiative administered by the United States Department of Education.  Since 1999, the California GEAR UP Program has been administered by the University of California with a charge to lead systemic reform through a programmatic focus on enhancing the organizational capacity of middle schools to prepare ALL students for success after high school.  The California GEAR UP Program serves primarily the adults who impact secondary school students: faculty, counselors, administrators, and families.

Purpose

The programmatic focus of the California GEAR UP Program is to develop and sustain the capacity of feeder sets of middle and high schools to prepare all students for higher education through a systemic network of support for the adults who influence secondary school students. By expanding the capacity of the adults, the expected result will be a greater proportion of students will graduate from high school and be able to access a greater array of postsecondary options without the need for remediation.

Program Goals

To increase the number of students at sets of participating middle and high schools who met or exceeded standards on grade-appropriate statewide assessments in English/Language Arts and Math by 10 percent as compared to the performance of students in the same grade at these schools in the 2016-17 school year.